Friday Flash: Blind Date Night Out

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The strikingly beautiful brunette grinned at her reflection in the magic mirror.  The low cut black dress was flattering without being too revealing; she adjusted her sheer shawl over bare white shoulders and quickly headed out the door.

She saw her target waiting in the downstairs bar, a glass of fine whisky in his hand as he looked at the crowd swaying to the slow steady rhythm of a blues ballad. He eyed the many women in the undulating mass, a gradual smile spread his lips slightly, a predator selecting his prey. Taking a sip from his drink, he stood up and turned into the brunette beauty, spilling whisky down his crisp new suit and nearly falling in the process.

“Hey, handsome,” she said, the predatory smile on her own face a perfect reflection of his own. “Oh, I’m sorry. Let me get that for you.” She ran one long, slender finger up his front; her red nail made a zipping sound as it scratched against the suddenly dry fabric. “That better?”

“Now, that you’re here, hon’,” he said, recovering quickly, “everything’s better.”

“Really? You sure? You wouldn’t rather go after that sweet young thing over there?” She gestured disdainfully at the woman he had been watching the moment before.

“No, of course not,” he said. “I thought she might be a good match for Hermes, because, you know–”

She shushed him with one red painted nail to his lips. “Hon’, no talk about the kids on ‘date night,’ remember?”

“Oh,” he said, then breathed, “you truly are a goddess.” He ogled her sleek form all the way up to her large brown eyes and full red lips. “See what you do to me? I lose my head when I’m around you.”

His wife’s smile was secretive and seductive. “So, handsome,” she purred, “let me get you another drink.” A glass of champagne suddenly appeared from nowhere. She offered him the glass with one hand, her own pina colada in the other, and they entwined arms before sipping from their drinks. “Now, where were we?”

 

*Image courtesy of BigFoto.com
*I’ll admit, Hera has been on my mind a lot, ever since completing my 2016 NaNoWriMo, so I thought it’d be fun for them to have a date night where Zeus has to pick up Hera at a bar. I think she was tempted to impersonate a mortal to catch him in a dalliance, but she resisted on the advice of their marriage counselor.

Books Read in 2016

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Greetings!

In the interest of reflection, I am posting a list of the books I read in the past year. Included in my list are ebooks, audiobooks, paperbacks, and graphic novels. I do not discriminate due to the amount of pages or words in any given work, whether fiction or nonfiction.

If you read my list from last year, you will note that I read fewer books than the year before–eighty-nine versus fifty-eight, which I attribute to consuming more poetry and less graphic novels. I also read a few paperbacks, which tend to take more time than ebooks, primarily because I usually forget to take them with me. Mainly though, I take more time when I read poetry, because I don’t usually feel I’ve gotten the full meaning and impact of a poem with just one reading.

Also, I’ve created this handy little color code, to make things easier:

Ebooks (novels, non fiction, & graphic novels): Red

Audiobooks: Blue

Physical books: Black

Because the list is long, I’m not going to comment on each book. You’re welcome.

 

  1. The Autobiography of James T.Kirk

  by David A. Goodman (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Mort(e) by Robert Repino (audiobook via Overdrive)

–a truly unique scifi story about a revolution where all the animals become sentient and (many) humanoid to overthrow the human race. In the midst of all this chaos, one sentient cat is searching for his best friend, the neighbor’s dog.

 

  1. Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk  (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison (paperback)

–the book that Soylent Green was based on, though the movie bears very little resemblance to the novel. Harrison wrote this novel as a warning about unchecked population growth.

 

  1. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Planet of the Damned by Harry Harrison (ebook via manybooks.net, read using the Overdrive app)

–one of my favorite books, a man-versus-environment adventure that demonstrates the necessity of understanding versus a brute force approach to environmental and social problems. I know that description doesn’t sound exciting, but trust me. The entire book is filled with life and death struggles, assassination attempts, poison, you name it. If you haven’t read this yet, check it out NOW.

 

  1. Winter (The Lunar Chronicles) by Marissa Meyer (audiobooks via  audible)

 

  1. Doctor Horrible by various (graphic novel via my Barnes &  Noble gift card)

 

  1. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Primary Phase (audiobook via Audible),  by Douglas Adams

 

  1. Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein (ebook via Overdrive)

–a scifi book that takes place almost entirely on Earth from the point of view of a human raised by Martians. What else is there to say?

 

  1. Deathworld by Harry Harrison (paperback)

 

  1. Bossypants by Tina Fey (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Deathworld 2 by Harry Harrison (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Doctor Who: Peacemaker by James Swallow (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Leonard by William Shatner  (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Against the Fall of Night by Arthur C. Clarke (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Doctor Who: Autonomy by Daniel Blythe (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Flow my tears, the Policeman said by Philip K. Dick (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1.  UBIK by Philip K. Dick (audiobook via Overdrive)

–in this world created by PKD, people communicate (via technology) with the dead for a limited period of time after passing. Also, humans regularly travel to the moon, and there’s anti-psychics and conspiracies.

 

  1. The Trouble with Poetry by Billy Collins (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. The Forever War by Joe Haldeman  (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Fool by Christopher Moore (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. The Walking Dead: No Turning Back (paperback graphic novel) by various authors

 

  1. Poetry on the Fly: 3WW by Tony Noland (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Investigating Lois Lane by Tim Hanley (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Aimless Love by Billy Collins (poetry) (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Confessions of a Buddhist Atheist by Stephen Batchelor (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. The Places We Find Ourselves by Diane Kendig (paperback)

 

  1. And a Pencil to Write Your Name: poems from the Nicaraguan Poetry Workshop, translated by Diane Kendig (paperback)
  1.  I, Iago by Nicole Galland (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Quantum Lyrics (poems) by Van Jordan (paperback)

 

  1. The Wasteland and Other Poems by TS Eliot (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. The Serpent of Venice by Christopher Moore (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Geek Wisdom: the Sacred Teachings of Nerd Culture by Stephen H. Segal (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1.  Crisis on Infinite Earths (graphic novel via Hoopla) by Marv Wolfman and George Perez

 

  1. Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss (paperback)

 

  1. Darth Plagueis by James Luceno (audiobook dvd)

 

  1.  Poets’ Corner compiled by John Lithgow (ebook and audiobook)

 

  1. Renascence and Other Poems by Edna St. Vincent Millay  (ebook via manybooks.net)

 

  1. A Few Figs from Thistles by Edna St. Vincent Millay (ebook via manybooks.net)

 

  1. The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Yes Please by Amy Poehler (ebook and audiobook via Overdrive)

 

45.The Absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian by Sherman Alexie (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. BLINK by Larry Koller  (beta–pdf)

 

  1. Confessions of a Crazy Cat Lady by Sandra Gurvis (paperback)

 

  1. Phantasmagoria and Other Poems by Lewis Carroll  (ebook via manybooks.net)

 

  1. The Walking Dead,  volume 25 (graphic novel via Hoopla)

 

  1. The Walking Dead, volume 26 (graphic novel via Hoopla)

 

  1. Crafting with Feminism by Bonnie Burton (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1. On Writing by Stephen King (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. The Geeky Chef by Cassandra Reeder (ebook via Hoopla)

 

  1. The Art of Peace by Morihei Ueshiba (audiobook via Hoopla)

 

  1. The Art of War by Sun Tzu  (ebook via Hoopla) (audiobook via Overdrive)

 

  1. Horoscopes for the Dead by Billy Collins (ebook via Overdrive)

 

  1.  Selected Poems of Langston Hughes, poetry collection by Langston Hughes (ebook via Overdrive)

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I did notice that some books are easier to consume as audiobooks, depending on the skill of the reader. For instance, Mort(e) was an incredible audiobook; however, if I’d just read the text, I would have missed the reader’s insight and humor. On the other hand, I think I would have enjoyed Winter, the last installment of the Lunar Chronicles, much more as pure text. The voices the reader chose to give the characters didn’t necessarily fit, and sometimes I just found them annoying.

 

Poetry, in general, I prefer to consume in paperback form in order to preserve the formatting. However, some poetry books were either only available as ebooks or simply easier to acquire in digital form. Overdrive, the library checkout program I use, has a system in place for some poetry so that minimal formatting is lost.

 

If you’d like to discuss any of the books in my list, feel free to comment below or contact me through Twitter or FaceBook. In the meantime, have a lovely week!

POEM: New Year’s Eve

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“New Year’s Eve”

 

About as far from Earth Day

as you can get,

a time many choose to hydrate

with alcohol instead of h20

-if that is even possible-

and try to see the road ahead

more clearly

-apparently while driving drunk

(This is a metaphor of course I would never advocate drinking and driving, always use a designated driver, please don’t sue me).

Couples kiss when the ball drops

(speaking of metaphors)

at Midnight,

beneath a brilliant, hearty neon ad

for the sponsor of

Dick Clark’s Rockin’ New Year’s Eve.

 

Mimes, those urban pariahs, skulk along the sidelines

hoping to catch the cameras

even as they mock the celebrations

with their silence.

Arty? Perhaps,

but head over heels couples

-once stirred from their warm embraces-

apply the phrase literally

to the nearby mimes,

-the mockers of their mirth,

pretenders of their passion,

kissy-faced buffoons-

and throw them in the nearest waste receptacle

(a fitting resting place for those white-painted imitators)

where

the next day

in the bright light of dawn

they are extracted by local garbagemen

-and women

and removed with the rest of the refuse.

 

A lone reveler,

awakened, bleary-eyed,

by the sun’s brilliant beams,

yawns and quips,

“He had a little too much to drink, Ossifer!”

Then, seeming to shrug off the previous night’s intoxication,

looks at the yard

-the ripped streamers,

broken discarded bottles,

and dropped foodstuffs now feeding the local pigeons-

and bends to pick up his first bit of trash.

 

 

*image courtesy of BigFoto.com

** This is a repost from my old blog that I thought would be fun to share again today. It was written during April of 2015 for National Poetry month and inspired by one of the daily prompts posted by the Cuyahoga County Public Library system.